Music and Speech

1 Minute Aphasia Tips: Music and Speech

This is another tip in our series of one-minute videos aimed at delivering quick ideas you can use to make your life a little easier if you have aphasia. Things are a little different for Aphasia Awareness Month. All of our videos this month are one-minute actions you can take to practice speech from home. In fact, this was one of our One Aphasia Action tips from this past spring.

In this tip, we encourage you to use music to get your words flowing.

If you haven’t yet subscribed to our YouTube channel, you’ll want to follow that link and click the red subscribe button. When you do that, you’ll see all the new videos in this series as soon as they’re released.

If you liked this video, be sure to share it with friends and family.

Music and Speech

Music is powerful: It can relax or energize us, trigger emotions, or transport us mentally to a different time or place.

Music isn’t just great for your general well-being—music can help you produce speech.

Luckily, any type of music will do, so grab your favorite song and use music to get the words flowing.

Choose any song, but aim for one with a repetitive chorus. Start by humming the song—no words necessary, yet. Next, try singing along with the song as it plays at a normal volume.

You’re going to repeat this four times, turning down the volume each time so the song gets quieter and quieter while your volume remains the same.

Once you’ve mastered singing, go for bonus points by speaking the song. If you can sing a song, you may be able to say a song.

This is just one thing you can do to practice speech from the comfort of your own home.

Like this tip? Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel to see new tips right when they’re released.

Comments

One Comment

  • Mark
    June 20, 2020 at 12:04 pm

    My stroke took a lot of my senses. Slowly it is coming back but not all. I had a heart attack and a stroke on 2/1/18. I have aphasia and I have low-vision. Every song seemed the same. Hard rock or soft melodies gave no memories of emotions. I take walks with my iPhone and listen to music. It helps. Thanks.
    Mark – Levittown, PA

We'd love to hear your thoughts below! Please note: inappropriate comments will be moderated.

Your email is never published nor shared.